Grain dust, Grasshoppers, and God

It is still my least favorite job in the history of the whole world.

Standing in the back of dad’s 2-ton red truck during harvest, shoveling the grain down into the corners of the truck as fast as I could as it poured from our John Deere combine’s auger. It always seemed like it was 134˚ on those days. With no shade.

And did I mention the crickets? Those horrible little creatures joined the ugly old grasshoppers and took up considerable space in the back of that truck. And on me.They landed EVERYWHERE. No body part or piece of clothing was immune to their ickiness. (Let’s pretend that’s a real word. It works for me.)

The choking grain dust and the intense heat and the miserable bugs and the fact that I kept losing my balance in the shifting grain made for a not-fun-at-all day.

But.

That was one of the many experiences that taught me what it meant to work. To work hard. (Can I hear an Amen! from my farmer friends!)

That was one of the best lessons I learned growing up.

And it was one of the most frustrating lessons I learned growing up.

See, because we learned to work hard, it was easy to believe that we ALWAYS had to work hard. That we could ALWAYS fix everything. That we could ALWAYS come up with the solutions. That we could ALWAYS do it ourselves.

But when I take that same belief into other parts of my life – into my faith life especially – it just doesn’t work.

Why not?

Because God never intended for us to fight our battles on our own. He never intended for us to fix everything. He never intended for us to fight for control of tough times. My back-of-the-truck work attitude worked at harvest time, but it doesn’t work in my faith life.

What does He intend for us?

He wants us to TRUST HIM. To let go. To stop fighting the battle on our own.

When the mountains loom large and we don’t have the strength to move them, it’s our FAITH that moves them. Not our hard work.

Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 2:5, “…so that your faith might not rest on men’s wisdom, but on God’s power.” I translate that to read, “…so my faith might not rest on my ability to shovel grain and work hard and fix everyone’s problems, but on God’s power.”

My friend.

If you are feeling a bit overwhelmed, worn out, and tired of the situation you’re trying to fix (or wish would go way), stop struggling with it. Sit down. Take a deep breath. Close your eyes. Say this to God … “God, I’m tired. Will you please take this ______ (situation)? You are wise. You know best. Please move this mountain. You love us all so much. I give this to you. And as I’m waiting for you to do the moving, please give me peace.”

And if you aren’t looking at any big mountains these days? Please share this encouragement with your friend who is. Show up and stand with her.

Paul writes later in that same chapter …

No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him.”

Now THAT brings HOPE.

So.

Ask God to move that mountain.

In His way. In His perfect timing.

He will.

 

 

You are Extraordinarily Significant!